Wednesday, March 14, 2018

A Horse of Course

Each time I work with the oil paints, I learn more and more, and each figure has a higher percentage painted via oils.  As you know, the primary reason I have turned to the oils is that the extended drying time allows me to work on more figures at one time.

I know that the trend towards wet pallets is quite a big thing at the moment... but what if the same principle could be applied to the figures as well?

This figure was painted along with dozens of others... from historical WW2 infantry figures, to fantasy monsters, to vehicles.  It is even more effective if the figures are 'grouped' into sets of common colors.  It does not matter what the genre is, the key is to group them together for maximum efficiency.

While speed is the ultimate goal, the side benefits include the ability to blend colors hours if not days after the initial applications!  That's a tremendously powerful tool, and it is also a more relaxed approach.  I often have to remind myself that I have plenty of time to take advantage of wet into wet blending, since I am so used to the more rapid drying time of the acrylic paints.

I have done numerous live sessions on the oil paints... here's an example:

I will be doing more sessions on the oils, as well as new Painting Pyramid videos!  Those will be available to the patrons on my Patreon page:

1 comment:

  1. So without a formal painting bnackground, zero experience with oils of any sort, and a couple of years of moderate miniature painting (painted a couple dozen miniatures that I am pretty happy with...) would you gravitate towards recommending to stay away from oils? I like the look they seem to give and i sure love the idea of easier, less rushed blends but i also figure if it was such a home run then everyone would be doing it and thats clearly not the case...