Thursday, January 25, 2018

The Fires of Mordor


Here's the final results on the experiment with the Vallejo Metal Medium.  While it is called "medium", the conversation that was generated after the initial post makes me think that I should say it is not a 'medium' in the classic sense... it is very much like metallic paint in consistency.  It is not a thin glazing style medium!

In the past I have used regular metallic paints and added them to regular colors, but those tended to shift the original color.  This is designed to turn the color you are using into a metallic paint without that kind of significant alteration.

If you want to see the original step by step post, you can view that here:



As I mentioned very often in the original post, it was an interesting challenge,  since I normally use various NMM techniques.  It just kinda worked out that way, since commission painting requires you to do what it requested, and that means matching previously painted figures and so on.

Also 22 years spent as a 2D artists meant that metallic paints were not part of the picture so to speak!  There are not metallic watercolors, oils or pastels.  This article was made to discuss that idea further:



The lava style base was made to create that sense of Mordor, and provide a lighting source for the OSL.  I have a number of painting videos on USB drives which discuss OSL, making these lava bases, and the fluorescent paints used in the process.  Here's a sample video of the Object Source Lighting:



I will try to do more experiments with the Metal Medium, so I am looking around for the best miniatures to show such techniques!  A facebook live session is in the works, which will be yet another live experiment where whatever happens is unrehearsed. :-)

You can support those live videos by subscribing to the Patreon Page.  Any amount makes it easier to produce more of these, and gives you the chance to win the monthly Raffle Figure!



4 comments:

  1. Beautiful work! I really like the glow from the lava, readily apparent yet perfectly understated.

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    1. Thanks! Yes indeed, it is very tricky, and sooooo easy to go nuts with the effect :)

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