Thursday, March 3, 2016

An Elephant Never Forgets


OK folks!  It's getting to be the final days of the Parallax Kickstarter campaign, and I thought I would save something fun for the countdown!

Here's a link to the campaign;



And then back to our shaman.  I had a lot of fun making the base and choosing the theme for the clothes.  With the flame in his hand, I just had to do some OSL.


I did add a little heavy gel medium to the flame to extend it in some places.


These views will give you a better look at the base.


And a penny for your thoughts for all those wondering what the scale is of this figure.  I believe the base is 80mm.


I looked through a number of saree patterns to find the right color to contrast with the flame, but also work with it.  Since the skin color was going to be such a neutral grey (as was the base), I knew that I had a little leeway here.


I shot some pictures on a different background, which gives you a different perspective on some of the brighter teal colors on the Saree.


One last image of an imposing character!

So, be sure to check out the campaign, and other fantastic figures just like this shaman!!


8 comments:

  1. That's amazing looking. Have you tried doing a GW ogre Firebelly?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for visiting the blog! It's always appreciated :-) Have you seen the WWX Willa Shaw on the speeder that I painted? It has the billowing cloud of fire just like the firebelly. That was a lot of fun!!

      Delete
  2. May I ask a question about the OSL? Do you add it after the miniature is painted? Is better to just add the colour of the light over the already painted surface, or paint with a mix of the base surface colour+colour of the light?

    I am just starting trying to learn OSL and I have seen both approaches, but not sure which is better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Since I work on all sections of the figure at once (see my shaded basecoat in many other posts), I work in the OSL effects in right from the beginning. This makes it easier to establish where such effects would hit the surface, and allow for chages along the way! That's even more important :-)

      Delete
    2. Hi James,

      As you work on all sections at once, does that include the intricate embroidery detailing, or is that added later?

      Thanks,

      Steve

      Delete
    3. The "setup" of the freehand happens as I do the rest of the figure, leaving the final details of the patterns to be refined at the very end.

      Delete